© 2013 -2019  by Eric Dietz.

The Girl with the Alkaline Eyes

A 70-minute dance-theater thriller, featuring live music and a commissioned score. Produced and performed by The Chase Brock Experience.

 

Direction and Choreography by Chase Brock

Scenario and Score by Eric Dietz

Photo by Michael Kushner

Photo by Michael Kushner

The Girl with the Alkaline Eyes is a unique dance-theater piece that melds theatrical conventions with dance innovations to create a show with many twists, turns, and technical ideas. A wild ride through the potential world of artificial intelligence… For dance lovers and theater people alike, this shocking story will resonate with anyone who owns an iPhone. It is not to be missed.”

 

– Brooke Viegut, Theatre Is Easy *Best Bet*

“I found it one of the best original compositions I have heard for dance in a long time. It can convey computer dilemmas, man’s search for love, and a dance at some sleazy nightclub. Really first rate. I wonder what he will deliver in the future.”

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– Barnett Serchuk, Broadway World

“…Dietz’s enjoyable post-minimalist score shimmers and pulsates with an echoing, electronic sheen as the music drives the story forward with anxious energy. Keyboards and strings, performed live and mixed with prerecorded music, render the attractive, Philip Glass-y score with a satisfying fullness of sound…”
 

- Michael Sommers, New York Stage Review

“Eric Dietz’s scenario and score reach to the heart of this piece with a surprising twist… Dietz’s music is glorious.”
 

- Suzanna Bowling, Times Square Chronicles

“Body language, movement, and music can create... more than words could ever say!"

 

– Sandi Durell, Theater Pizzazz

Videos

“Combined with Eric Dietz’s moving original score, performed live by a trio helmed by Rob Berman, the complexities of emotion and machine are effortlessly mixed to follow the shocking twists this story takes. With movement vocabulary ranging from finger pulses to walking patterns to technical ballet, Brock pulls from his entire tool box to differentiate between humans and robots, and to blur the lines between both…”

 

- Brooke Viegut, Theatre is Easy

Photos by Michael Kushner